A History of the Kenilworth Chess Club

by Michael David Wojcio

1972-1980 | 1980-1990 | The Club Championship | Exhibitions | The Future

PART FOUR - EXHIBITIONS

Blindfold Play

In the Fall of 1991, NM Scott Massey gave the first of several blindfold exhibitions at the club, taking on two players at a time sequentially for three rounds, making a total of six players during the course of the night. Scott went 5-1. The winner was Ed Rodda.

NM Scott Massey during his blindfold exhibition (click left to open another photo).
Ed Rodda is the player to the right (click right to open another photo).

What was most impressive about the event was that Scott had memorized all six games and went over each one afterward. Ed Rodda’s game was the last and towards the end Scott stated that he forgot that a pawn was on g4 or he would have taken the Bishop delivering check at f5, with at least a draw by perpetual check, which he was able to demonstrate from memory.









 
EnglishA28
Four Knights 
Nimzovich Variation 

Scott Massey
Ed Rodda

Blindfold Exhibition at Kenilworth CC (3)
Kenilworth, NJ USA, 1991


1. c4 e5 2. Nc3 Nf6 3. Nf3 Nc6 4. e4 Bc5 5. Nxe5 Nxe5 6. d4 Bb4 7. dxe5 Nxe4 8. Qd4 Nxc3 9. bxc3 Be7 10. Qg4 10. c5 10... g6 11. Bh6 d6 12. Qd4 Rg8 13. O-O-O!? Bg5+ 14. Bxg5 Qxg5+ 15. f4 dxe5 16. Re1 16. fxg5! exd4 17. cxd4+/= 16... Qe7 17. Rxe5 Be6 18. Be2? 18. c5!+/= 18... Qa3+ 19. Kb1 Rd8 20. Qe3 Kd7! 21. g4 Kc8 22. f5 Bd7 23. Rd1 Rge8 24. fxg6 fxg6 25. Rd2 Rxe5 26. Qxe5 Bf5+? 27. Bd3?? 27. gxf5! Rxd2 28. Qe6+! Kd8 29. Qg8+ Ke7 30. Qxh7+ Kd6 31. Qxg6+ Kc5 32. Qg1+ Kc6 33. Bf3+ Kd6 34. Qg3+ Kd7 35. Qg7+ Kc8 36. Qg8+= 27... Bxd3+ 28. Rxd3 Rxd3 29. Qe6+ Rd7 30. Qe8+ Rd8 31. Qe6+ Kb8 0-1

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There have been a number of records in blindfold chess. Janos Flesch of Hungary, played 52 people successively in 12 hours, but he won 31, lost 18 and drew 3, so it is actually only rated somewhere in the best 5-10 performances of all time. The best two performances were in by Gorge Koltanowski in 1937. In one, he played 34 successive opponents in 13½ hours and won 24 and drew 10. In my opinion, the best performance of all time, though, was by Miguel Najdorf in 1945 playing 45 opponents simultaneously in San Paulo, Brazil. He won 39, drew 4 and lost 2.

Lectures and Simuls

When I was president anyone (including myself) could give a lecture. Scott’s lectures through the years have been excellent. He has given the club many lectures. Also worth mentioning was expert Jason Cohen’s lecture about corresponding squares on September 21, 1995. I wish that I had kept my notes on that one, since Jason explained it very well compared to some esoteric theory I’ve heard from others. Yet, the best lecture that I ever heard at the club (or for that matter anywhere) was when Scott talked about the history of Bobby Fischer in November 2004. He talked at length about this before going over some of Bobby’s games and it was both interesting and educational.

In 1990 I started simultaneous exhibitions and lectures and we had many GMs and Masters helping us create major club events up until the year 2000. Before every simul was a lecture. There were 18 Simultaneous Exhibitions at our club while I was president. I realize we never did get players like those famed GM’s Steve Doyle got at the Tom’s River Club, but we had good turn-outs and promoted chess too. Our policy was that the chess player had to be a master or better to give a simul. I always made the rules touch piece and playing your own game without anyone’s help. Also the last one playing had to end it with a timed 5-minute game. Simuls can take a long time and this always helped to speed it up at the end. We let the Grandmaster or Master make the decision about the color of their opponents. Accordingly, GM Arthur Bisguier contributed to some of our rules that we used later on. He suggested that anyone could play with the white pieces if they paid five dollars more. I liked Arthur’s idea very much.

I’m glad the newly elected Dean of US Chess gave us a lecture and simul back in 1993. I still remember in his lecture he told us the absolute value of castling with the kings on the board once a piece or pawn is taken. He further supported this by showing how talented GM Anand could have had better results in his match against Kasparov if he had castled early.

The only difficulty I had was to get the attention of the master or GM giving the lecture to stop it and start the simultaneous. Pat Mazzillo, Richard Faceltano, some others, and myself worked on making name cards for everyone. Sometimes Greg Tomkovich and some others donated refreshments. I took many pictures, did the publicity (by passing out flyers but by especially making many phone calls), and made sure a few latecomers could play as long as they promised to make about five to fifteen moves to catch up with everyone else. During the 1990’s we had 349 players during those 18 simultaneous exhibitions. It’s good to give some sort of incentive and if anybody ever won their game against the master or titled player they would get their money back or receive a prize (usually a chess book).


NM Scott Massey

NM Todd Lunna

GM Max Dlugy 1990

GM Ron Henley

I consider Max Dlugy’s performance in 1990 the best, although he lost a game. I realize Ron Henley played exceptionally well with a 24-0 performance and had a perfect score! Yet he took 4 hours and he made sure all of his opponents played with the black pieces. Amazingly, Dlugy played 26 people in 2 hours and gave everyone choice of color! Many people took white. In addition to that, when Max played the exhibition I remember that there were quite a few strong players that he faced that day. By the way, John Fedorowitz’s record in 1995 with 21 wins and 3 draws was in my opinion a great performance. “Fed” gave them all a choice of color and did it in 2 1/4 hours. Also the late GM Edgar Mednis’s 25-0-3 record was outstanding. He did actually win the most games and played 28 people.

During those 18 lectures and simultaneous exhibitions B-player Pedro Figueroa played the best with four wins! He was a well-liked gentleman at the club and was on my chess team the Chessaholics for five years at the U.S. Amateur team. Pedro then moved to Missouri. I wrote to him several times. He moved again and I lost touch with him. I remember the night in 1992 when we played a rated match (1/2 hour each) at the club. Pedro and I ended up going 3-3 and we finished at 4:00 a.m. It was hard staying awake teaching my students the next day. If anyone knows where Pedro is please tell him to contact us by e-mail.

 

18 Simultaneous Exhibtions
Date
Master
Opponents
Color
Results (W-L-D)
Hours
Winners
March 1990
NM Scott Massey
15
B/W
14-0-1
3
Alex Sack drew
April 1990
GM Ron Henley
24
W
24-0
4
None
June 1990
GM Max Dlugy
26
B/W
24-1-1
2
Rich Lewis
June 1991
NM Todd Lunna
18
B/W
11-1-6
3.5
Pedro Figueroa
July 1991
NM Charles Adelman
15
W
14-1-0
3*
Bill Bluestone
October 1991
GM Edmar Mednis
28
W
25-0-3
4
Alex Sack and Jack McCorkell drew
June 1992
GM John Fedorowitz
26
B/W
23-1-2
4
Bill Simonitis
April 1993
FM Steve Stoyko
20
W
16-2-2
3
Pete Cavaliere
June 1993
GM Arthur Bisguier
23
W
18-5-0
3.5
Jason Cohen, Irving Ellner, Greg Tomkovich, Tony Kutzma, and Ed Selling
October 1993
NM Scott Massey
14
B/W
10-2-2
3.5
Alex Sack and Richard Falcetano
May 1994
NM Brian McCarthy
21
B/W
14-4-3
3.5
Jason Cohen, Bill Cohen, Mike Wojcio, Mikhail Kruglyak
October 1994
NM Scott Massey
12
B/W
8-3-1
4.5
Llya Manevich, Richard Falcetano
January 1995
GM Max Dlugy
22
B/W
19-1-2
2.5
Jason Cohen
June 1995
GM John Fedorowitz
24
B/W
21-0-3
2.5
Pete Cavaliere, Yaacov Norwitz and Mike Wojcio drew
October 1995
GM Arthur Bisguier
20
W
15-2-3
2.5
Ed Selling
May 1999
NM Scott Massey
15
W
11-1-3
3.5
Mike Wojcio, Dennis Perri, and Steve Souris
June 1999
NM Yaacov Norwitz
6
W
4-0-2
3
Greg Tomkovich and Pete Cavaliere drew
November 1999
NM Scott Massey
19
W
12-4-3
3
Dennis Perri, Pedro Figueroa
* Clock simul


Here are some of the better games by members of the club in the simuls we held.









 
Czech BenoniA56
King's Indian System 

Max Dlugy
Richard Lewis

Simultaneous at Kenilworth Chess Club
Kenilworth, NJ USA, 1990


1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 c5 3. d5 e5 4. Nc3 d6 5. e4 Be7 6. Bd3 O-O 7. Nge2 Nbd7 8. f3 Re8 9. Be3 Nf8 10. Qd2 Ng6 11. g3 a6 12. h4 Nh5 13. O-O-O b5! Sacrificing a pawn to create open lines for attack against the White king. 14. cxb5 axb5 15. Bxb5 Bd7 16. Bxd7 Qxd7 17. g4 Nhf4 18. h5 Nxe2+ 19. Qxe2 Nf4 20. Qd2?! Bg5 21. Kb1 Reb8 22. Rh2 c4! A key move, securing b3 for the attack. 23. Ka1 h6 24. Rb1 Qb7 25. Rhh1 Qa6 26. Bxf4 Qxa2+!! and mates in three. 0-1

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PircB07
Byrne Variation 

Arthur Bisguier (2464)
Irving Ellner (1958)

Kenilworth CC Simul
Kenilworth, NJ USA, 1993


1. e4 d6 2. d4 Nf6 3. Nc3 g6 4. Bg5 Bg7 5. f4 O-O 6. e5 Ne8 6... Ng4!? 7. Nf3 c6 8. Bd3 Qc7 9. O-O Bg4 10. h3 Bxf3 11. Qxf3 f6 12. exf6 exf6 13. Bh4 f5 14. Bf2 d5= 15. Rfe1 Nd6! 16. Be3 Nd7 17. Nd1 Nf6 Black now has complete control over the e4 square. 18. Nf2 Rae8 19. Bd2 Nfe4! -+ And only now does he occupy e4! 20. Bb4 Bxd4 21. Bxd6 Qxd6 22. Bxe4 fxe4 23. Qd1 Qc5 24. Re2 Rxf4 Black's game is completely overwhelming. 0-1

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EnglishA14
Neo-Catalan Declined 

Steve Stoyko
Pete Cavaliere

Kenilworth Chess Club Simultaneous Exhib
Kenilworth, NJ USA, 1993


1. Nf3 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. g3 d5 4. Bg2 c6 5. b3 Bd6 6. Bb2 Nbd7 7. O-O O-O 8. d3 Qe7 9. Nbd2 e5 10. cxd5 Nxd5 11. Nc4 This is all probably still theory. 11... Bc7 12. Ba3 Nb4 13. Qd2 a5 14. Bb2 f6 Pete solidly regroups his forces. 15. Nh4 Nb6 16. e4 With the plan of attacking on the kingside. 16... Nxc4 17. dxc4 Rd8 18. Qe2 Nd3 18... a4 19. Bc3 Nc5 20. Rad1 Ne6 21. Nf5 Qf8 22. Rxd8 Nxd8 23. Rd1 Ne6 Despite Black's long Knight tour, he has somehow maintained the balance. 24. a4 c5 25. Bh3 Nd4! 26. Nxd4 cxd4 26... exd4 27. Bxc8 Qxc8!? 28. Bd2 Qh3 27. Bxc8 Rxc8 28. Bd2 b6 29. Qg4 Rd8 30. f4 Qf7 31. fxe5 31. f5!? 31... Bxe5 32. Bf4 Qg6 33. Qxg6 hxg6 Black's passed pawns gives him some chances in the ending. 34. Kf2 g5?! 35. Bxe5 fxe5 36. Kf3 Kf7 37. Kg4 Ke6!? Was this a blunder or a deliberate sacrifice? Interestingly, Black appears to have good winning chances despite the loss of a pawn. 37... Kg6 38. Rf1 38. Kxg5 Rh8 39. h4 Rf8 40. Rd3 Rf6 41. g4 Rf4? 42. Kh5? It's amazing how often players blunder in pairs because they both overlook the tactical shot. 42. Rxd4!+- 42... Rxe4-+ Now it's Black who is winning. 43. g5 Re3 44. Rd1 Rxb3 45. Kg6 Rh3 46. h5 d3 47. Kxg7 Rxh5 48. Rxd3 Rxg5+ 49. Kh6 Rg4 50. Rb3 Rxc4 51. Rxb6+ Kd5 52. Kg5 Rxa4 and Black soon won. 0-1

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King's IndianE70
Accelerated Averbakh System 

Arthur Bisguier (2464)
Ed Selling

Simultaneous Exhibition at the KCC
Kenilworth, NJ USA, 1995


1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 g6 3. Nc3 Bg7 4. e4 d6 5. Bg5 O-O 6. f4 Nc6 7. d5 Nb8 8. Bd3 Bg4 9. Qd2 c6 10. h3 Bd7 11. Nf3 cxd5 12. cxd5 Na6 13. O-O 13. e5!? 13... Nc5 14. Bc2 Qb6 15. Kh2 h6 16. Bxf6 exf6! Black will now have tremendous pressure against White's pawn at e4. 17. f5 Kh7 18. a3 a5 19. Nd4 a4 20. Rf3 Rac8 21. fxg6+ fxg6 22. Rg3 Nb3? 23. Bxb3 axb3 24. Rd1?!= 24. Ne6! Bxe6 25. dxe6 f5 26. Nd5 Rc2 27. Qd3 24... f5 25. exf5 Bxf5 26. Nxf5 Rxf5 27. Kh1 Rcf8 28. Re3 Rf1+ 29. Rxf1 Rxf1+ 30. Kh2 Be5+ 31. g3 Bd4 32. Re7+ Kg8 33. Qxh6?? Better 33. Qd3 and the game is still unclear. 33... Bg1+! and forces mate. 0-1

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Ruy LopezC60
Cozio Defense 
Paulsen Variation 

Arthur Bisguier (2464)
Tom Shih

Simultaneous Exhibition at KCC
Kenilworth, NJ USA, 1995


1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 Nge7 4. Nc3 g6 5. d4 exd4 6. Nd5 Nxd5 7. exd5 Qe7+ 8. Kf1 Qc5 9. Qe2+ Ne7 10. Bg5 Qxd5 11. Re1 Qd6 12. Bc4 f6 13. Bh4 c6 14. Bb3 Kd8 15. Bg3 15. Qd3! xd4 15... Qc5 16. h4?! d5 17. h5 g5 18. h6?! Bd7 19. Kg1 Nf5 20. Qd2 Nxg3 21. fxg3 d3+ 22. Kf1 dxc2 23. Bxc2 Qb4! 24. Qc1 Qg4 25. Re3 Qxg3 26. Qd2 g4 27. Nd4 Qf4+ 28. Ke1? Bxh6 29. Rxh6 Qxh6 30. Re8+?? Rxe8+ 0-1

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Updated June 08, 2005